Amy Lee Sanford

Amy Lee Sanford: Full Circle

June 25, 4:30-7 PM & June 26, 4-6 PM, The Museum of Contemporary Art, garden

 

Humans experience the process of leaving home, leaving or losing near ones and arriving elsewhere differently. Full Circle, Roskilde 2016, is a meditative and introspective performance, exploring cycles of human trauma, healing, and the reconstruction of life in the present.

Artist Amy Lee Sanford sits with several utilitarian Cambodian clay pots (made in her ancestral home province of Kampong Chhnang in Cambodia). She breaks and repairs each pot over two days in the garden of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Roskilde. After each pot is glued back together the artist uses string to encircle the repaired item, before returning the pot to its original location on the stage. During the 1975-79 Khmer Rouge regime, which orchestrated the genocide in Cambodia, millions of Cambodians were enslaved, tortured and killed or died of starvation, disease and overwork. This durational performance consists of breaking and remaking clay pots to bring attention to the cycles of human trauma, the experience of sudden loss, and the reestablishment of life both personally and societal.

 

Single Break Pot: Darupvej

June 27 & 28, 2-3 PM, Roskilde Festival, train station west

 

Humans experience the process of leaving home, leaving or losing near ones and arriving elsewhere differently. Single Break Pot: The Roskilde Festival is a meditative and introspective performance, exploring cycles of human trauma, healing, and the reconstruction of life in the present.

Artist Amy Lee Sanford sits with one utilitarian Cambodian clay pot (made in her ancestral home province of Kampong Chhnang in Cambodia). She breaks and repairs the pot at the Roskilde Train Station. After the pot is glued back together the artist uses string to encircle the repaired item, before returning the pot to it's original location in the performance. During the 1975-79 Khmer Rouge regime, which orchestrated the genocide in Cambodia, millions of Cambodians were enslaved, tortured and killed or died of starvation, disease and overwork. This durational performance consists of breaking and remaking a clay pot to bring attention to the cycles of human trauma, the experience of sudden loss, and the reestablishment of life both personally and societally.

Amy Lee Sanford studied Visual Art at Brown University, with concentrated study in Engineering and Biology. She also studied ceramics at the Rhode Island School of Design, University of Massachusetts and Harvard. In 2005, Amy returned to Cambodia for the first time in 30 years in search of her family and heritage.



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Sidst opdateret

23.06.2016

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Julie Damgaard Nielsen